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  • December 4, 2014
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Former Microsoft executive turned career coach shares her meteoric entrepreneurial rise in only 18 months| Dana Manciagli
  • in Dana Manciagli, Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Former Microsoft executive turned career coach shares her meteoric entrepreneurial rise in only 18 months| Dana Manciagli

Dana Manciagli

Former Microsoft sales and marketing executive turned career coach shares her biggest mistake and meteoric entrepreneurial rise in only 18 months


Dana Manciagli
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Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

Origin point

"If I go back just to 18 months ago after breaking out of corporate America, I would have gotten a virtual marketing assistant earlier. This is not just a virtual assistant that helps me with administrative things. This is an assistant salesperson to help me build a great process up front to track and follow up on prospects. My background was in sales so I know how to build a funnel and pipeline but it takes a lot of time. As business owners we have to watch where we invest our time in things that make the most sense."
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2)

Outsourcing

"Outsourcing is great to help build the systems and processes. What someone else can help us with is expanding the field. Think big and then build the tools to scale."
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3)

Biggest mistake

"Not saying ‘No’ to more things. My twin sister taught me to watch out for the 'shoulds'. I would meet with people, love their ideas, but then feel compelled to do them. It's important to network and ask for those insights. Going back I’d have prevented more 'shoulds' from distracting from my core business.”
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4)

Favorite part of entrepreneur's journey

"I jumped out of corporate America after 30 years. I love the time flexibility. I can work as hard as I want or take a break. I can be gracious with my time and donate speeches to the local university."
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5)

The second crucial myth that hurts businesses

"Inability to prioritize. I don't just mean kick the 'shoulds' out. First-time business starters think they can take things as they come. Or they just convince themselves they have to let doors open. You must be able to stack rank your priorities so you're able to execute on your top ones. One little trick I do is block time in my calendar to get my big things done. I do my best to let no interruptions during this time."
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6)

Pitching

"I was a nobody. I'm still a nobody. But you can pitch anybody with a great concept and the worst they can do is say 'no'. I pitched the headquarters of the Biz Journals and got a nationally syndicated column instead of just the local Seattle column I was going for."
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Why Listen to Dana:

- an outsourcing piece many young companies miss that costs them big

- why saying ‘No’ more often and preventing the ‘shoulds’ is critical

- how to have the confidence to pitch and win a national column

- the 2nd crucial myth that’s probably hurting your business

- the seemingly unrelated to business lesson her identical twin sister taught her that drives big profits

She's a Weekly career columnist for the Biz Journals nationally syndicated website.

Dana Manciagli is a career expert, speaker, and private coach. She spent more than 30 years as a Fortune 500 sales and marketing executive, and is now retired after over a decade’s tenure at Microsoft. Dana is the author of the book, Cut the Crap™, Get a Job! and a prolific blogger.
 
A recognized career, networking, and business thought leader, she is a sought-after speaker and a regular contributor to print and online publications, including her own nationally syndicated Career Mojo column in all of the Business Journals. She was named among Seattle’s Women of Influence, sits on the worldwide board of Junior Achievement, and received her MBA from the Thunderbird School of Global Management.

She got hurt business featured on the large Jumbotron in Times Square in New York City. This happened because of her small business solopreneur publicity work.

At 18, she and her identical twin sister were asked to be one of the three bachelorettes on the dating game TV show. They were bachelorette number one. The joke was on the guy asking the questions because he didn't know there were three sets of bachelorettes on the other side. Dana and her sister Tracy alternated answering questions and were selected as his chosen bachelorette.

Her 30 years as a sales and marketing executive were mostly at Fortune 500 companies but also one startup. She always had a side passion to mentor and help others with their career choices and specifically with their job search and networking.

Two years ago the stars aligned for her to make a huge break out of corporate America. She started her own business as a global career speaker and private coach. She helps people make career transitions, network and find their next job.

Some Shareables from Dana in this episode…

Outsourcing

"We can think creatively about outsourcing virtually anything in our business at a very competitive or even low cost. I was afraid of investing too much in outsourcing but it gets us so much further ahead. My virtual sales assistant can make hundreds of contacts on my behalf and then I pick them up as they become warmer."

Biggest mistake

"Not saying ‘No’ to more things. Other people recommended I go and do things. My twin sister taught me to watch out for the 'shoulds'. I would meet with people, love their ideas, but then feel compelled to do them. It's important to network and ask for those insights. I would have prevented more 'shoulds' from distracting from my core business and following my revenue... global speaker and private coach."

Watch the shoulds

"It sounds easy to watch the 'shoulds'. But it's not because we meet with such incredibly smart people. I met with a great executive headhunter who said I should target recruiters. I bounced the idea off a few recruiters who thought it was a great idea. I spent time and money building a proposal. I hit the big goose egg. In fact, my plate was already full with my own great ideas in my wheelhouse. Now I list out those other ideas so when I have a window to think about them I'll do that. This way I stay focused on my 2 core revenue streams."

Cutting off possibilities

"It takes confidence to pare down to only one or two options. Many of my executive job seekers want to hunt for 3 or 4 different types of jobs at a time. I tell them ‘No’ and to pick no more than 2 job types at a time."

Favorite part of entrepreneur's journey

"There are so many since I jumped out of corporate America after 30 years. The first is being able to manage my own time. I can work as hard as I want or take a break. I can be gracious with my time and donate speeches to the local university. I love the time flexibility."

"The second thing I love about being an entrepreneur is the ability to think big. You hear about it but we get to put it into practice. I aspired to be a columnist for the local business journal. I pitched their headquarters instead landing a nationally syndicated column in 43 major cities not just Seattle."

Weirdest thing

"I got an e-mail invite to speak at an organization. We negotiated, selected a topic and they met my speaking fee. When I went to research the company there wasn't any clear information on their website. I started to ask them questions but they didn't reply. I asked an association of speakers if they'd heard about this company. One of their speakers advised me that this was a scam. They were looking to get a bank account number. I had been so excited about the new speaking gig but you have to be cautious."

Discovering a scam

"A company agreed to my speaking fee and the topic. I was researching them to find out more about their audience. There was nothing there. Nothing to show they ran this conference last year. It was a mythical company."

Conventional wisdom

"At the startup it was Crawl before you walk before you run. Learn, do then adjust. Make smaller investments upfront until you know what you're going to go big on with your money. Instead I loaded up my investments in the first six months. I went against conventional wisdom to progress carefully. I was focused on building the field... my infrastructure so I could be successful. I needed to invest heavy in my website, public relations, book publishing (got mine out within the first 30 days of my business) because self-publishing is an upfront spend model. Social media was another area I invested big on to integrate all of my platforms and have somebody do all the scheduling for me. Bottom line, I got great PR exposure early including TV. I gained clients and speaking engagements because I looked like a professional."

Publishing my book 'Cut the crap, get a job'

"My book was in my head for at least eight years. It is a challenge especially if someone has a full-time job. It was a full-time job for a month to write the book, get all the endorsements you need and get it published. Some people aren't comfortable writing. I understand why many people's books remain only in their heads."

Conventional myths that hurt business

"Starting my business I met with many other smart people including other small business owners. I hear over and over 'I don't want to do a plan because I don't have all the answers and it's a waste of time'. Or 'I don't want to write out a plan because I know exactly what my business is'. I've been trained by great companies and know these two thoughts hurt a business. You have no beacon to aim for. You don't know when you're off plan. I recommend doing a plan so you learn the planning discipline early. You can change your plan anytime."

The second crucial myth that hurts businesses

"Inability to prioritize. I don't just mean kick the 'shoulds' out. First-time business starters think they can take things as they come. Or they just convince themselves they have to let doors open. You must be able to stack rank your priorities so you're able to execute on your top ones. One little trick I do is block time in my calendar to get my big things done. I do my best to let no interruptions during this time."

Learn more about Dana:

http://DanaManciagli.com

News Media Dana has been featured in:

- Forbes
- Time Magazine
- Money Magazine
- BBC
- Fast Company
- Money Magazine
- NPR
- Investor’s Business Daily
- The Boston Globe
- Intuit
- MSN Money
- CNBC
- Bank of America Small Business Community
- Career Mojo column in all of the Business Journals
- Named among Seattle’s “Top 20 Women of Influence”
- Interviewed by Jeffrey W. Hayzlett
- Executive Speakers
- ProfNet
- Womenetics
- TED Magazine
- Salon
- Ad Hoc News
- Seattle Pacific University (spu.edu)
- Star Tribune
- Ivy Exec
- CBS News
- FOX TV 13
- The Street
- Business Insider
- US News
- SF Examiner
- Yahoo Finance
- Examiner
- Informer
- Aspen Times
- Mashpedia

 

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