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Archive for Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Cameron Herold

Cameron Herold

Former hard-charging COO of 1-800—Got-Junk now coaches CEOs bringing a more collaborative style based on hard-won lessons


oDr. Ritamarie Loscalz

Listen-Podcast-Here


Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

Biggest mistake

“Our CFO kept telling us to be careful and he was worried about money. We kept saying not to worry about it, that we would push through it. Sure enough he was right. The big lesson is to use my ears and mouth in the same ratio they were given. Listen twice as often as I talk.”
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2)

Advice for leaders

“It didn't matter if I was right or not. What mattered is if as a company we were making the right decisions.”
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3)

WWRB?

"What would Richard Branson do? If he came into your organization for one day what changes would he make?"
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4)

Smart like a Billionaire?

"I remember seeing this billionaire at our tennis club in Vancouver. He was waiting for this young girl. He handed her a $50 bill. She sat down and started showing him how to leverage his technology and how to use certain tools on his MacBook and iPhone. It showed me that being the smartest person in the room often means asking the most questions."
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5)

Bad conventional wisdom

“People think if you just sell more you'll make more money which isn't true. You could sell more but your cost of goods sold and your overhead eats up so much of your revenue that you'd be better off getting a minimum-wage job.”
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6)

Realistic projections

“Take your projections and cut them by 70%. Can you make your business go and be profitable at only 20% or 30%? We're often way too optimistic with our projections. I call it the uninformed optimism in the startup phase and that's what gets us into trouble."
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In the audio, Cameron Herold shares:

- What he learned from a guy who was making $600,000 profit per day

- How to avoid the big mistake that almost brought down 1-800-Got-Junk before it's massive success

- His tip to get in with some of the top CEO and investor groups in the world

- What social network he's had the best success connecting with top CEOs (it's not the business network you're thinking)

- The circumstances where making more sales would be worse than a minimum wage job

- How to get past the dark side of ego + firm beliefs instead using them to your advantage

- He once told Uber CEO Garrett Camp the idea was stupid and what happened in the aftermath

- How he helped Elon Musk and Kimbal Musk before anyone other than their mom knew who they were

- What his dad told him as a child that still impacts him today

- The franchise that started his entrepreneurial journey and how he got promoted into the corporate office

Throughout his career, Cameron Herold has been instrumental in the successful sale, branding and integration of a remarkable 500 business locations with three major companies.He may be best known as a driving force behind 1-800-GOT-JUNK?'s spectacular growth from $2 Million to $106 Million in revenue in just six years. But this dynamic leader has been a entrepreneurial innovator since launching his first company at the age of 21.

His wide range of executive roles has given him expertise across all aspects of business, from strategic planning, operations, people, sales, marketing, call centers and PR. Combined with hands-on experience negotiating corporate acquisitions and developing numerous strategic partnerships, there are few real-world business challenges he hasn't faced.

Now, as the author of Double Double, Cameron mentors a select class of proven CEOs, entrepreneurs and their teams, helping them navigate growth, leadership, and building their own unique company cultures.

He reaches an even broader audience through his content-driven presentations to groups of entrepreneurs, speaking in over twenty countries, on five continents, in just five years. 

Cameron is a top-rated lecturer at the EO/MIT Entrepreneurial Masters Program and a powerful and effective speaker at EO/YPO & Vistage events around the world.

Additionally, he landed over 5,000 media placements in six years - including coverage on Oprah, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Inc. Magazine, Fast Company, Fortune and 17 spots on Dr. Phil.

Some Shareables from Cameron Herold in this episode…

#1 path to growth

"I called the last chapter of my Double Double book, ‘Letters to my 16-year-old self’. I wrote the business lessons I now know that I wish I'd known when I started my business journey. The biggest thing I do is not take myself so seriously and have more fun along the way. I remember at the end of the day that none of us are getting out alive and this is just what we do to make money. The seriousness doesn't help you get any better results."

Biggest mistake

"Brian, CEO of 1-800-Got-Junk, and I didn't listen. We were very strong drivers, aggressive and firm in our beliefs. We often steamrolled over people who had dissenting opinions without knowing we were doing it. We had a head of finance who reported to us. He was very quiet and diminutive. He was very passive. He kept telling us to be careful and he was worried about money. We kept saying not to worry about it that we would push through it.

Sure enough he was right. What Brian and I wish we would have done is to listen more actively. We should have asked more questions to understand where he was coming from instead of always insisting we were right. The big lesson is to use my ears and mouth in the same ratio they were given. Listen twice as often as I talk."

Advice for leaders

“You hired really smart people. What if they’re right? Approach every discussion to understand where they're coming from. Don't argue to be right. Seek to understand them more. It didn't matter if I was right or not. What mattered is if as a company we were making the right decisions.”

Favorite part

"I've been blessed to come inside some incredible organizations and learn from those top CEOs. Last week I was on site in the Bahamas working with this group of 60 CEOs. I got to have lunch with some of them at an elite hotel and restaurant called Graycliff. I got a tour of the third-largest wine seller in the world and an understanding of how they built the business and brand.

About two weeks ago I had dinner with a guy who at his peak was doing $3 million in revenue per day, $600,000 of that per day was profits. He was in an all cash business operating in all 50 states. He was buying all of his product from the US government. At the time he was arrested in 1991 he was the largest drug dealer in US history. I was learning from him how to build an empire in an industry I didn't previously understand.”

“Freeway Rick Ross was buying all of his product on consignment from the US government that had been seized in the Iran-Contra. He would get the product first and pay them back with the sales proceeds more than he would've paid them if he had paid upfront. This was great for cash flow. All too often we attempt to negotiate price. Rick Ross understood to negotiate terms.

The other big insight was his employee and customer relationships. All of his employees carry guns so a fight could be very detrimental to business because the police would come in and shut him down. He needed to solve all his employee and customer disputes using core values. I thought it was incredible he understood how important core values are in an organization.”

"I'm often the expert going in to speak at these events. But I get to learn from the CEOs who are being vulnerable. It's powerful to be around people who wake up every day wanting to get better.“

Weirdest thing

"I went to Burning Man for the first time in 2007 because 3 CEOs who didn't know each other all invited me. I introduced them to each other. Before that, I didn't know what Burning Man was. Now I've been five times. It was bizarre because it ripped me out of my comfort zone. I saw people who I knew were powerful and successful letting their guard down and that's when I realized I was taking myself too seriously."

Counterintuitive

"A couple of things. One is raise my prices higher than I think they should be. A second would be firing some clients. I just got rid of some people who I did not enjoy spending time with. I don't have any coaching clients who are negative drains on me.”

Bad conventional wisdom

“People think if you just sell more you'll make more money which isn't true. You could sell more but your cost of goods sold and your overhead eats up so much of your revenue that you'd be better off getting a minimum-wage job.”

"If you're going to sell your time as a consultant, Only about 35% of your time will be billable time. 35% of your time you'll spend managing your business but nobody’s paying you to do that. Then about 30% of your time, you'll be doing marketing and sales to generate clients. So think about what does your hourly rate need to be if you can only bill 15 hours per week? Does that add up to enough money over the course of the year?”

“At the end of the day you have to charge what you want but you can't think of your self as a commodity. You have to add more value."

“Have more fun along the way. The seriousness doesn't help you get any better results.”

"The starting point for my business career was when my father told me as a child that having a job was a really bad idea and I should always want to work for myself."

"I was told jobs weren't very safe because what happens if the boss comes in one day and says, ‘You're fired!’ Then you're kind of screwed."

Learn more about Cameron Herold:

http://CameronHerold.com

Type in Cameron Herold on TED Talks to find his TED Talk.

His book Double Double on Amazon.

She overcame limiting beliefs and 1 breakthrough realization led to her current 7 figure a year business… | Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo

Dr Ritamarie Loscalzo

She overcame limiting beliefs and 1 breakthrough realization led to her current 7 figure a year business


Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo

Listen-Podcast-Here


Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

#1 path to growth

“I’d beg, borrow and steal to get enough money to hire somebody who could help me instead of doing it all myself. That would've shortcutted my business journey by five or 10 years.”
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2)

Biggest mistake

“When I look back, the biggest mistake I made was thinking that marketing was sleazy. I thought I should just grow my practice by word of mouth. Now I realize marketing is just this awesome educational process.”
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3)

Even Employees…

“If you're not able to hone in on the benefits of them hiring you or working with you, you're not going to survive. Everyone should be doing education based marketing.”
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4)

Bad conventional wisdom

people are sucked into thinking they have to have a certain depth of knowledge before they can teach a topic. Many people think they need one more degree or one more certification.
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5)

Educational advice

"Act while you're learning."
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In the audio, Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo shares:

- The #1 thing she'd have done sooner to grow her coaching program while being more valuable to each student

- Her biggest mistaken belief about marketing and the fix

- Her biggest marketing win and the 1 type of marketing every business should be doing

- What made her decide to leave her well-paying computer job to strike out on her own

– The insight she gained when her body started burning out in her mid 20s and how it led to her passion today

- What she did to heal herself

Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo is fiercely committed to transforming our current broken disease-care system into a true health care system where each and every practitioner is skilled at finding the root cause of health challenges and using ancient healing wisdom married with modern scientific research to restore balance.

As the founder of the Institute of Nutritional Endocrinology, Dr. Ritamarie specializes in using the wisdom of nature to restore balance to hormones with a special emphasis on thyroid, adrenal, and insulin imbalances. Her practitioner training programs empower health and nutrition
practitioners to get to the root cause by using functional assessments and natural therapeutics to balance the endocrine system, the master controller.

Dr. Ritamarie is a licensed Doctor of Chiropractic with Certifications in Acupuncture, Nutrition, Herbal Medicine, and HeartMath®. She’s also a certified living foods chef, instructor, and coach, and she has trained and certified hundreds of others in the art of using palate-pleasing whole fresh food as medicine.

A best-selling author, speaker, and internationally recognized nutrition and women’s health authority with over 23 years of clinical experience, Dr. Ritamarie offers online courses, long- distance coaching and counseling, and deeply empowering and informative live events. Her wildly popular practitioner certification program empowers health and wellness professionals to unravel the mystery of their clients’ complex health challenges, so they become known as go-to practitioners for true healing and lasting results.

She and one other person built a membership site over the last three years with 30 different membership levels and thousands of members. She also enjoys adventures having hang glided in New Zealand among other things.

Some Shareables from Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo in this episode…

#1 path to growth

“I’d beg, borrow and steal to get enough money to hire somebody who could help me instead of doing it all myself. That would've shortcutted my business journey by five or 10 years. I would have gone out into the community and done educational talks. At the end I would have made an offer for my services.

I’d have gotten people excited about regaining and keeping their health. I would have started in-person group coaching programs because we didn't have the Internet back then. Instead of repeating the same thing over and over, I would have offered a recording via cassette tape at that time, and given that to them. I’d have developed educational materials sooner."

Biggest mistake

“When I look back, the biggest mistake I made was thinking that marketing was sleazy. I thought I should just grow my practice by word of mouth. Now I realize marketing is just this awesome educational process.

You educate people, they learn what you can do, and how you can help them and you make an offer for how they can go forward with you. To not do that is unethical. Even if you're an employee you're going to have to communicate and sell yourself. If you're not able to hone in on the benefits of them hiring you or working with you, you're not going to survive. Everyone should be doing education based marketing.”

Favorite part of entrepreneurs journey

“Learning how to share my message with confidence that allows me to reach people. I love being able to get on interviews and teach on webinars. This allows me to reach and impact many people."

Weirdest thing

"I was teaching a three day event on cleansing and detoxing. We got to a point where I was talking about brushing your skin and scraping your tongue. Then we moved into enemas and colonics. Once I opened the floor for questions we spoke for 45 minutes about poop. There were 100 people in the audience and I felt like we were three years old again. It's taboo to talk about so once they had the opening they flooded me with questions.”

Counterintuitive

“Back in the day when I was first learning about teleseminars and doing group coaching programs, I was excited because I wanted to teach a program about thyroids. I was hot to teach a webinar about it so I fired out an e-mail only two days before. I don't know why I couldn’t have waited a week but I didn't.

From this one e-mail, 1,500 people registered for the webinar. I sent the e-mail to about 5,000 people so was very happy with the response. I was sitting down to do the slides and then thought, ‘Wait a minute. I'm supposed to offer them something because they're going to want to go further.’ I didn't even know what the program is going to be but that afternoon I laid it out. I would charge $97 to teach them what they needed to know about their labs, genetics and thyroid. And how to create a nutrition program that works for them.

35 people signed up, 5 of them for the $1,000 level. The counterintuitive piece is I had no idea what the program was going to be. I didn't tell them the what of the program I just told them the results they were going to get. I didn't tell them it was going to be five weeks or 12 weeks. I just said we're going to do some calls and maybe some checklists. I didn't know what it was but I offered it anyway.

That's totally against conventional wisdom because you're supposed to have it planned out with the pretty sales page. All I had was a link to go to that took their money. They had no idea what they were signing up for. People afterwards wrote to me saying they had no idea what they just signed up for but they were sure it was going to be good."

Bad conventional wisdom

“Some of the bad conventional wisdom is that you must have gone to Harvard business school before creating your own business or have an MBA of some sort. This is a limiting belief. Also, people are sucked into thinking they have to have a certain depth of knowledge before they can teach a topic. Many people think they need one more degree or one more certification.

For a long time I felt I had to get more degrees in order to have the credibility. When really what I needed was the expertise and the experience. This is the other part of where conventional wisdom fails is thinking if you just have the education you can then guide and help people. The truth of the matter is that’s not even close to being true. You need practical experience to understand people and their psychology.”

Learn more about Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo:

If you're a health practitioner or want to be go to:
Http://NutritionalEndocrinology.com
Http://NEPTApply.com
Http://DrRitamarie.com

  • July 2, 2015
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Self-described fixed mindset sufferer from the fixed IQ era of the US, shares what she did to overcome… | Carol Dweck
  • in Carol Dweck, Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Self-described fixed mindset sufferer from the fixed IQ era of the US, shares what she did to overcome… | Carol Dweck

Carol Dweck

Self-described fixed mindset sufferer from the fixed IQ era of the US, shares what she did to overcome and sell over 1 million copies of her book worldwide


Carol Dweck

Listen-Podcast-Here


Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

Everyone has but loses…

“Everyone as a baby has a natural thirst to learn and grow. But many lose this due to the era or society they grow up in."
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2)

How to develop a growth mindset

"I grew up in the fixed IQ era. Through my research, I've been amazed at what I and others can accomplish when adopting a growth mindset."
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3)

The biggest factor separating the successful from the unsuccessful

“Whether you're a student, athlete or entrepreneur having that growth mindset serves you well because you take on the right challenges and learn from what happens to you rather than being defensive."
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4)

Common traits shared by the successful

“First I want to point out that mindsets are just beliefs. They're not fixed personality traits. Our research has shown we can teach people a growth mindset.”
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5)

Common big mistakes of business owners

"The first mistake is to feel that as the boss you have to know everything… To know all the answers. Instead, you are one of the learners like everybody else. Admit mistakes and learn from them. Listen to input from your employees.
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We have found in our research that when you do this the employees feel so much more empowered and committed to your business.”

6)

The most productive kind of feedback

“We find in our research, giving feedback about your process and strategy is the kind of corrective feedback a leader needs constantly. And it's the kind of feedback a leader needs to give to others. And rewarding people for failures if they've really milked something valuable out of it.”
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In the audio, Carol Dweck shares:

– Me-search: What is it and which of the two groups of people succeed?

- The two mindsets. Failure is devastating if you have one mindset, energizing if you have the other

– The biggest factor separating the successful from the unsuccessful

- Which of the two mindsets Carol started out with and which she's developing in herself right now

- Her research shows this type of company culture fosters the best innovation and employee commitment

- What praise and mindset to seek out to stay on top of new trends

Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., is a leading researcher in the field of motivation and is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford. She has a new TED talk. Her research focuses on why people succeed and how to foster their success. More specifically, her work has demonstrated the role of mindsets in success and has shown how praise for intelligence can undermine motivation and learning.

She has also held professorships at and Columbia and Harvard Universities, has lectured to education, business, and sports groups all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. She recently won the Distinguished Scientific Contribution awards from the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Her work has been prominently featured in such publications as The New Yorker, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Manchester Guardian, and The London Times, with recent feature stories on her work in the Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, and she has appeared on such shows as Today, Good Morning America, NPR’s Morning Edition, and 20/20. Her bestselling book Mindset (published by Random House) has been widely acclaimed and has been translated into more than 20 languages. It has sold over 1 million copies worldwide.

Some Shareables from Carol Dweck in this episode…

The biggest factor separating the successful from the unsuccessful

"Some people believe their basic talents and abilities are just fixed traits. They believe you have a certain amount and that's it. I call this the fixed mindset. In a fixed mindset people worry if they're smart or not smart, if they're talented or not talented. They build their lives around looking talented and showing people they're smart.

Other people have a growth mindset. They believe these talents and abilities can be developed. Not everyone is the same but they can develop. They spend their time learning and trying to get smarter. These are the people who take on challenges. They are motivated and even energized in the face of setbacks because setbacks are informative. You can milk setbacks for lots of great information.

Whether you're a student, athlete or entrepreneur having that growth mindset serves you well because you take on the right challenges and learn from what happens to you rather than being defensive."

Common traits shared by the successful

“First I want to point out that mindsets are just beliefs. They're not fixed personality traits. Our research has shown we can teach people a growth mindset.

When we do, they become more open to change and perseverance. The first characteristic of someone with a growth mindset is the desire to take on challenges and learn. They don't say to themselves, ‘What if I make a mistake? What if I make a fool of myself?’

The second characteristic is a total commitment to what ever challenge they take on. Even when things go wrong you're not defensive but instead face up to it. They think what do I do next? A growth mindset is about growing, learning and persevering."

First step into the growth mindset

“No matter who you are or how strong you're fixed mindset is, the first thing you can do to start changing into a growth mindset is to recognize and own your fixed mindset. People think a fixed mindset is bad and simply deny having it. But they haven't done the work of recognizing and announcing to themselves that they have a fixed mindset. Instead listen to that fixed mindset voice in your head that wonders if you'll make a mistake and look like a fool.

Listen to that voice in your head that's telling you not to take risks and that mistakes are humiliating. Do that for a week or two. Rub your face in your fixed mindset.

Then, start talking back to that voice with a growth mindset. Tell yourself, ‘I’m going to take on this challenge no matter what. I made mistakes and my fixed mindset is making me feel embarrassed but I am going to keep going.’ Realize you have a choice. Keep talking back with the growth mindset."

Common big mistakes of business owners

"The first mistake is to feel that as the boss you have to know everything… To know all the answers. Instead, you are one of the learners like everybody else. Admit mistakes and learn from them. Listen to input from your employees.

We have found in our research that when you do this the employees feel so much more empowered and committed to your business.

Another big mistake is to focus just on hiring talent. We found that when a company just worships talent it doesn't have that innovative feel. The employees aren't nearly as motivated. Instead focus on employee growth and giving employees the chance to take on projects and shine."

Counterintuitive start up wisdom

“Common intuition is that a strong leader knows everything and is totally confident. He decides everything right away. He doesn't need input. He's the resident genius. But that is not a recipe for long-term success.”

Bad conventional wisdom

“Thing we've found over and over in our research is that the kind of praise we give one another is tremendously important. A lot of entrepreneurs want the wrong kind of praise and give the wrong kind of praise. We have found that praising talent, intelligence and ability backfires. It puts people into a fixed mindset and makes them vulnerable.

In the world today, most businesses are constantly transforming. You need people who tell you what you're doing right and what you're doing wrong. We find in our research, giving feedback about your process and strategy is the kind of corrective feedback a leader needs constantly. And it's the kind of feedback a leader needs to give to others. And rewarding people for failures if they've really milked something valuable out of it.”

Learn more about Carol Dweck:

http://MindsetOnline.com

At 17, he first spoke in front of CEOs at what would become Vistage. Today… | Tim Levy

Tim Levy

At 17, he first spoke in front of CEOs at what would become Vistage. Today, he helps CEOs and purpose driven companies do more.


Tim Levy

Listen-Podcast-Here


Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

#1 mistake of small business

"When I look at very small businesses, the number one rookie move is to do everything yourself.”
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2)

Biggest mistaken assumption

“The big mistake is thinking you know what your market wants. It's important instead to evolve your products or services in conversation and concert with your emerging customers rather than attempting to force your product on the market and hoping for the best."
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3)

Danger in “just diving in”

“Without thinking too much I just started to naturally build a multimedia agency because that's the type of work I had done in the past. It was successful fairly quickly and I had a large full-time staff. This was a terrible mistake because I didn't like doing it. I know that seems like an obvious thing but money without purpose doesn't seem to last very long.”
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4)

Biggest mistake

“My biggest mistake was not looking into what makes me tick and what I really enjoy. I love doing purposeful work that leads to good in the world."
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5)

Definite Funny

"We work with comedians to make sure it's not just funny in my brain but funny across the board."
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6)

Heckled, then client flood

“This guy stood up and started yelling and cursing at me. I dealt with it and it turned out to be fine. What was even stranger is the amount of people out of that room who hired me and my team because of the way I handled that heckler.”
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7)

Sales Funnel not best

“We found the funnel model isn't always best. For us, starting with the Rolls-Royce pricing has performed best."
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In the audio, Tim Levy shares:

-- Why focusing on your product or service is not the #1 path to growth and is instead a rookie mistake

-- How to avoid wasting years going down the wrong business path and what to master instead

-- The #1 problem clients have is how to get enough business to survive and thrive. Tim shares his solution.

-- The reason why he folded his successful multimedia agency and the lesson learned

-- Why his “Rolls-Royce” funnel works better and in what market it performs better in

-- 1 unexpected food place where Tim has found customer service Tech talent

Tim got his first speaking engagement in a business setting when he was only 17 years old. It was for a company called The Executive Connection which has now become Vistage. Vistage is an international group of CEOs. Tim has spoken at Secret Knock, CEO Space International, The E Women's Network, the Women's Presidents organization, and at too many other organizations to list individually here.

He works with clients who are CEOs of $2 million-$100 million companies. He focuses on strategy and coaching with these clients. He's been featured on many of the major business media publications.

At one point, he traveled around Australia doing entertainment shows for up to 5,000 children at a time. This was during the point in his career when he was doing children's books and children's TV shows for Random House.

He had a multimedia company based in Silicon Valley for many years. Then he moved back to Australia for about 10 years from the year 2000 to the year 2010 to found his family. Then he moved his whole family to Austin Texas where he now resides.

Some Shareables from Tim Levy in this episode…

#1 Path to growth

"I worked for a company called Wavelength in Australia for a few years before starting my own company. Most businesses focus on ‘The what'. As in what am I going to make? What am I going to sell? They focus on getting that as absolutely perfect as possible. In hindsight, I see that as a rookie move.

The most important part of any business is sales. So how are you going to drive thousands or tens of thousands of people through your shop’s front door? That could be your online website or a phone call or your physical doors. The big mistake is thinking you know what your market wants. It's important instead to evolve your products or services in conversation and concert with your emerging customers rather than attempting to force your product on the market and hoping for the best."

Biggest mistake

"In the late 90s I got back to Australia right around the time of the tech crash. Without thinking too much I just started to naturally build a multimedia agency because that's the type of work I had done in the past. It was successful fairly quickly and I had a large full-time staff. This was a terrible mistake because I didn't like doing it. I know that seems like an obvious thing but money without purpose doesn't seem to last very long.

It's hard to apply the time required to build the business over the long term which can be decades, if you're not passionate about what you're doing. My biggest mistake was not looking into what makes me tick and what I really enjoy. I love doing purposeful work that leads to good in the world."

"The other mistake entrepreneurs tend to make is holding onto things for too long. It's like when you're in a relationship and you should have cut that boyfriend or girlfriend loose a while ago but you don't. The same is true with companies. You want to be able to hold them lightly and adjust swiftly. If there is a piece that doesn't work, cut it loose and start again. Don't be afraid to do that."

Favorite part

"I've had a colorful entrepreneurial journey. I've done books, albums, stage shows and television shows. If I look at my favorite days, those are where I'm on stage or on camera. I love to do comedy from stage as well."

Weirdest thing

"I've done lots of public speaking. Sometimes what comes up is truly odd. I've experienced weird stalking situations. I like to do interactive workshops and gave one of the guys feedback. We were drawing mind maps which are very organic and creative. He put his in a grid almost like an Excel spreadsheet. I turned his piece of paper over and said just for fun here's what a mind map looks like and let's see if we can access your creative right brain.

We got to the end of the three-hour workshop. The chairman of the group asked if anybody in the audience had feedback. This guy stood up and started yelling and cursing at me. I dealt with it and it turned out to be fine. I've dealt with lots of heckling over the years though very few to that extreme.

That was very odd but what was even stranger is the amount of people out of that room who hired me and my team because of the way I handled that heckler. In the moment I thought that heckler was a terrible thing but it turned out to be a wonderful thing."

Counterintuitive

"When I came to Austin around 2011 I got involved in the Internet marketing community but didn't feel like I fit there because of some of the ethical conundrums. One of the systems they loved was selling something supercheap and moving people up to higher buying levels. We set up some stuff like that and it worked okay.

What was interesting to me is we flipped that on its head and it worked very well for us. We found the funnel model isn't always best. For us, starting with the Rolls-Royce pricing has performed best."

Bad conventional wisdom

"When I look at very small businesses, the number one rookie move is to do everything yourself. The old model was committing to an idea, getting funding and then hiring full-time people which imprisoned you to the business for years or more at a time. That is a rookie move. Whether you raise money or not the marketplace has changed dramatically.

You can have project-based staff members that you hire from fiverr.com, Elance.com and others. We like to use craigslist because we prefer to work with people local here in Austin. We find terrific people with amazing talent through craigslist and at a very reasonable pay rate. What business owners consider most unaffordable is actually very affordable. You can have one less coffee or one less steak meal and get many more things done.

With between $50-$1,000 you can get highly skilled people to do the things you're not good at. If you're not good at websites, even with the point-and-click tools available today to build your own, it's just not going to be as good as if a professional built it for you. There are savvy ways to do things online and you should keep your eye out there first. Don't be afraid to hire, especially things that aren't your strengths."

Learn more about Tim Levy:

http://TimLevy.net

or search Tim Levy on Amazon or YouTube.

Former Introvert and best-selling author from a town of 300 now connects with billionaires and… | Judy Robinett

Judy Robinett

Former Introvert and best-selling author from a town of 300 now connects with billionaires and helps fund hundred million dollar business deals


Judy Robinett

Listen-Podcast-Here

Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

#1 in today’s economy

“First thing I’d do is work on myself a bit and kick fear to the curb. When I think back about how much wasted time I spent worrying about whether something would work or is this the right path, I wrote pros and cons. Most of the time the pros went away once I got the job. Many of the cons turned out to be good things.”
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2)

Barbara Corcoran’s fear

“Barbara Corcoran said every step of the way on her journey to becoming a billionaire she worried about going bankrupt. No matter what level you're at we all have fears and problems. This means you have an opportunity to help even billionaires."
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3)

Mary Kay said

"Mary Kay once said she knew what people wanted more than money and sex. It was to be acknowledged"
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4)

talk to a billionaire

"People ask me how could I talk to a millionaire or billionaire? The best thing you can do is listen with your ears, eyes and heart.”
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5)

2 secrets to approach strangers

"There are two secrets to approaching a stranger. The first is ask a question. The second is give a compliment."
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6)

Why give compliments?

"if it's genuine, people love a complement. So few of us are told nice things."
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7)

Core Formula for success

“My core formula for success is human relationships + strategy to a specific outcome. The middle part, strategy, involves being a little scrappy and doing what it takes."
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8)

Never perfect time

“In life there's never the perfect time. Anytime you have a vision, Goliaths shows up."
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9)

Oprah on reading people

"I heard this from Oprah, when someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time."
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In the audio, Judy Robinett shares:

-- The fairy tale in the middle class and education. The counter truth she discovered that actually works in the business world

-- The key she found to raising money in any environment… Especially the current state where it's tough to raise money

-- How to access the $369 Trillion in private global wealth for your business

-- 50% of people in the US identify as shy. How to adjust your mindset for mutual benefit whether you're an extrovert or introvert

-- 2 simple secrets to meet any stranger

-- Judy shares her core formula for success which is human relationships + strategy to a specific outcome

-- Judy’s realization at 38 involving the Johari window tool and how this can help you

Judy Robinett is the author of How to Be a Power Connector . Robinett is a business thought leader profiled in Forbes, Huffington Post, and Bloomberg as a “super connectors” who uses their 30 years entrepreneurial experience and connections to accelerate growth and enhance profitability of public and private businesses.

Mark Burnett (successful reality TV show producer) endorsed her book.

She grew up in rural Idaho and went to the same high school as the Napoleon Dynamite movie. She knew no one of wealth or power. She was an extreme introvert. She's obviously gotten over that to live the power connector lifestyle and write a book about her system.

She served as CEO of a small public company. Before getting that position a book that had a profound impact on her life was Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People.

Some Shareables from Judy Robinett in this episode…

#1 Path to growth

“First thing I’d do is work on myself a bit and kick fear to the curb. When I think back about how much wasted time I spent worrying about whether something would work or is this the right path, I wrote pros and cons. Most of the time the pros went away once I got the job. Many of the cons turned out to be good things.

I wish I had learned earlier there's two kinds of fear… Good fear and bad fear. The Greeks have two separate words for this. The good fear is when you step out and achieve your vision. You feel fear which is the same feeling as excitement. If I could have dealt with fear earlier I'd be so much further ahead.”

“Barbara Corcoran said every step of the way on her journey to becoming a billionaire she worried about going bankrupt. No matter what level you're at we all have fears and problems. This means you have an opportunity to help even billionaires."

"Mary Kay once said she knew what people wanted more than money and sex. It was to be acknowledged"

"People ask me how could I talk to a millionaire or billionaire? The best thing you can do is listen with your ears, eyes and heart. If you're fearful about meeting people, just focus on the simple firm handshake and look them in the eyes. Then listen.”

"There are two secrets to approaching a stranger. The first is ask a question. The second is give a compliment."

“If it's genuine, people love a compliment. So few of us are told nice things."

Biggest mistake

“Years ago I was giving a speech at MIT. Somebody handed me a Wall Street Journal article on 5 ways to get rich. Doctor, lawyer, inherit it, marry it and I thought. ‘The first four ways are out.’ #5 was start a business so I thought to myself, ‘How hard could it be?’

I got a $1.5 million SBA loan and stupid me started a restaurant franchise. I almost went bankrupt. I thought I was bankrupt. I went to a bankruptcy attorney shaking in my boots. I was so depressed I could barely pull myself out of bed in the morning. This guy said to me you're not even close to bankrupt. I said, but I'm broke!

At that point I said I'm going to put up the hair on my neck and just go for it. I turned that restaurant around then started helping other startups. I helped Skullcandy when the founder was broke and nobody had heard of them. They went public about two years ago with a market cap of $550 million.”

Favorite part

"I figured out how to make things happen at lightning speed. If somebody told me where they wanted to go, I can figure out how to get them there."

“My core formula for success is human relationships + strategy to a specific outcome. The middle part, strategy, involves being a little scrappy and doing what it takes."

“In life there's never the perfect time. Anytime you have a vision, Goliaths shows up."

"Everything you need is attached to a human being. Humans write the checks. Humans know about the jobs. They know where the opportunities are. As soon as you realize that it becomes how can we do it instead of if we can do it.”

"Everything you do says who you are. Research shows the number one thing to convey to strangers is warmth. We want to know this person is safe. The second thing we look for is some level of competence. I have a third one that's important to me which is generosity. Just because someone can help you doesn't mean they will.”

"I heard this from Oprah, when someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time."

"One of the reasons I look for warmth and empathy is because that takes out the sociopaths. Often sociopaths are very bright, very cunning but the one thing they're not born with is empathy."

"Research shows 95% of people are wonderful and will help you if you'd ask. But especially if you grew up lower or middle-class, we're taught not to ask. That's a critical skill you need."

Counterintuitive

"I would take jobs at the drop of a hat if it paid more and I was able to learn. This would drive my father nuts because he would say I wasn't going to have a retirement. I went from making $30,000 per year when I was young to making $350,000 per year. That wouldn't have happened on the traditional path."

"Grow comfortable with chaos. I love chaos because you can create whatever you want. There's no rules."

"The Johari window shows a few things but one of the big ones is what other people see about you that you don't see. This is known as the blind spot. It's absolutely critical to ask 3 to 5 people you know, ‘What are the 3 best things about me?’ Usually people are surprised what they find out and that there's a pattern."

“Going from shy to bold is just a series of baby steps. Along the way you get emboldened.”

"The secret is consistent daily action overtime. For instance, if you count the network you already have, you probably have the necessary 25 to 50 Quality relationships you need for success. If you map it out on paper you'll instantly see connections you hadn't thought of and making introductions is one of the most powerful things you can do. the second thing your connection map shows you is holes you need to fill-in. Make it a practice of making two introductions per week.”

"My three golden questions are: how may I help you? After you shared your story you ask, what other ideas do you have for me? Who else do you know I should talk to? That gives you the best information to move toward your goal.”

Conventional myth

“There's so much bad conventional wisdom out there. The number one reason a business exists is to serve customers. So sales covers almost all sins. It takes a different skill set to move a mom-and-pop to higher levels than a business doing multiple millions."

Learn more about Judy Robinett:

http://JudyRobinett.com

Grab her book How to Be a Power Connector on Amazon.

  • May 27, 2015
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Yearning to break out of the pit of 1 of the big 6 corporate consulting firms, Jeff felt the entrepreneurial itch and… | Jeff Waller
  • in Hidden Profit Path Podcasts, Jeff Waller

Yearning to break out of the pit of 1 of the big 6 corporate consulting firms, Jeff felt the entrepreneurial itch and… | Jeff Waller

Jeff Waller

Yearning to break out of the pit of 1 of the big 6 corporate consulting firms, Jeff felt the entrepreneurial itch and acted on it in a counterintuitive way


Jeff Waller

Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

#1 in today’s economy

"Where your passion and the desires of others meet, that's your vocation." ~Aristotle
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2)

Overcoming Discomfort

"The fact I was putting my name on a product was uncomfortable and the judgment that might come from it. That held me back. It's also very uncomfortable to be in the dream stage and the vision stage where there's lots of high energy, fun and big ideas!"
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3)

Fast Failure

"There is a term now called 'fast failure'. Fail fast, fail often and move forward. Then adjust and go. That's how you build true businesses."
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4)

Revealing Dark Adversity

"It's in those darkest moments of adversity that you find out who you are and what you're made of. It's in those moments you become very creative and make decisions to change yourself."
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5)

Dangerous “Wisdom”

"The conventional wisdom of finding a market need and filling it is a very dangerous strategy today. I think you need to look inside before you look out."
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6)

Path to Fulfillment

"What are you good at? What do you enjoy doing? Does what you're doing a line with your value system? What matters to you? If you can find that connection you will be very successful financially and also build a fulfilling life."
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7)

Confidence Builder

"When you're in those valleys you start to slowly build confidence. This is temporary so let's not lock up here and instead get creative."
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8)

Wrong Decision?

"There isn't really a wrong decision you've just got to make your decision the right one. Half the battle is having confidence in your decision."
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9)

#1 Reason Businesses Fail

"The #1 reason businesses fail is because people stop trying. The #1 reason they stopped trying is because they lose the juice, they lose the interest."
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In the audio, Jeff Waller shares:

-- The 2 top business visionaries he looks up to and the most pivotal trait Jeff admires about each of them

-- The biggest danger to be aware of before taking venture capital

-- His big "kicking himself" realization that lost their business a year to a year and a half

-- The two big factors he had to overcome (one is perfectionism) that you probably face

-- How he worked with the school system and kids to market his business

-- A unique revelation and hope out of the darkest times of adversity

-- The devices he uses to make decisions in a confusing and constantly changing business environment

-- Counterintuitive - how getting denied venture capital benefited their business to a much larger extent

-- The #1 reason businesses fail, the #1 reason people quit and the solution to both

Jeff Waller is a leading visionary on youth achievement. He has dedicated
the last decade to learning and understanding the critical elements that denote high achievers. He is the co-author and co-creator of 7 Mindsets and the E.M.P.O.W.E.R. methodology, a revolutionary approach to engaging young people in their own self-development process. Jeff is a co-founder of the Magic Wand Foundation, Excent Corporation, and is President of 7 Mindsets.

Jeff was an avid golfer in high school even shooting a hole-in-one. If you don't know much about golf, hitting the ball in the hole with only one shot off the tee is very difficult.

In their business, after over four years of exhaustive research and six months of presenting the material, they were able to write the 7 Mindsets book in about six weeks. It helps they were under a time crunch because a customer had already purchased the book so Jeff Waller and Scott Shickler were going to have to deliver the book within four months anyway.

Jeff graduated from Georgia Tech University. Soon after he went into the large corporate world with one of the big six consulting firms. He did strategic planning for Fidelity and Chase. After about nine years he got an itch in the pit of his stomach... it would turn out to be the entrepreneurial itch.

He credits the success of his first entrepreneurial venture because he partnered with people of vast entrepreneurial experience. He has the talent of developing strategies, business plans and seeing patterns and trends to take advantage of.

In his early 20s he discovered his insatiable thirst for knowledge and reading books. He estimates he's read about 1,000 books related to personal development.

A big fact that spurred him during research was finding that depression was 10 times more prevalent now than it was in the 1960s. The average age depression sets in now is 14 years old versus 30 years old just 50 years ago.

They compiled this research into numerous products to help both young people in the education system and adults in the business world. Over four years and millions of dollars went into this research and the products show it.

Some Shareables from Jeff Waller in this episode…

#1 Path to growth

"Going back to my origin, and even to this day, my two business idols were Walt Disney and Steve Jobs. They were the complete package. Obviously, they could sell and market. What I really admire about them is they produced products of the highest quality that transformed industries. As Apple was developing products, throughout the process Steve Jobs would say, ‘Great companies ship.' Apple has this tremendous creative process which I always thought drove their company. But instead, Jobs drove it forward by deadlines.

I understand this now. You have to get your product to market. It will build clarity around your pricing. You will get instant feedback on the pain points and what the needs are. You'll learn a lot about what's working and not working. You can begin the process of accelerating your business.

Starting over with this knowledge about shipping and deadlines, I would've had a much greater urgency during the dreaming and visioning stage to commercialize what we were working on. I’d have gotten us to market one year or one year and a half sooner."

Biggest mistake

"My biggest mistake is an easy one to point out. Mitch Schlimer, who's coached entrepreneurs over 35 years, talks about it a lot because he's seen it with entrepreneurs hundreds of times. He tries so hard to prevent it but with very little success. He believes we are shiny object people and it's hard to let something pass. You have to make this mistake for yourself. As entrepreneurs we overextend ourselves and get outside of our zone of skills where we can be successful.

We opened a restaurant in 2005 and overextended ourselves. Being the geniuses we are, in 2007 we decided to open a second restaurant. Why open one when you can open two at twice the price? We did okay but we were doing something we didn't enjoy. Opening a restaurant is really hard. We wanted to build a brand. That takes a lot of sweat equity that we didn't end up investing.

I believe this five years was among the most important of my business life because I learned so much about myself. We met a ton of people who've been instrumental in our success. This is where we learned the marketing strategy. We would go to the local schools to do these workshops on empowerment. We’d give all the kids coupons to bring their parents into our restaurant."

Favorite part of the journey

"It's self-discovery. I believe our purpose here on earth is to become all we can be. We can increase the substance of who we are and do the most with what we have. I don't think there's any better sharpening stone to do that with than entrepreneurship. It's in those darkest moments of adversity that you find out who you are and what you're made of. It's in those moments you become very creative and make decisions to change yourself. I'm a better person, business person and father even though it hasn't always been enjoyable."

Weirdest thing

"If you've been around us you'll see the number 37 pop up all over the place. People always ask, ‘What is 37?' Well it's not the classic that we only had $.37 in our bank account when we got started. 37 is the new 24/7 where you living the 7 mindsets three times per day. That sounds great from a marketing perspective but the real reason behind 37 is something we rarely share.

It's almost this religious, mystical thing. I call it a guidepost. The number 37 seems to appear at really critical points in the process for us. We were at a restaurant discussing a really important decision when the number 37 showed up on a receipt. Then as were going forward we’ll see the number 37 on a road sign or a license plate. That's the universe telling us what direction to go. Athletes have their superstitions and 37 has become something like that for us."

Counterintuitive

"What we found during our 7 mindsets research is that most people are acting in direct opposition to the useful mindsets. The intuitive approach is often the wrong approach because it's based on these counter mindsets. I fell prey to this.

When we got on this world domination strategy for our 7 mindsets business I figured it would take a large influx of capital. I had worked in businesses and incubators where that was the model. We tried to raise capital but for whatever reason we were never able to bring capital in. I look back on it and it made us scrappy. It gave us a discipline. We've been able to benefit to a much larger extent because we didn't get that big investment from a venture company.

"I like your Segway of associating ignorance with raising capital."

Bad conventional wisdom

"Six months ago I came upon this... it said don't do what the world needs. Find out what brings you alive and to do that. Because what the world needs is people who've come alive. I believe the model of finding the market need and filling it is dead. There's a very small group of quintessential entrepreneurs like Richard Branson who just love the process of building businesses. Most people don't. For the vast majority of people, myself included, we've got to find something we love in order to be successful. Or we'll fail because it's a different world than 20 to 40 years ago.

There are more people doing this than in the past. There's more access to information. Best practices are temporary at best. Differentiation is only going to come from desire. No matter what you choose, you're going to hit a point where it's really tough. If the vision and the dream is not bigger than this moment, it's really easy to quit. The number one reason businesses fail is because people stop trying. The number one reason they stopped trying is because they lose the juice, they lose the interest. That's why the self-discovery process is so important."

"We look at Napoleon Hill's research of the 500 most successful people in the history of America. What was the difference? It was really two things...

First off, they expected success. Second they were able to sustain an unbelievable burning desire. The reason there were able to sustain that burning desire is because what they were trying to accomplish in their life was fundamentally connected to who they are."

Learn more about Jeff Waller:

jeff “@“ 7mindsets.com

http://7Mindsets.com - for the daily quick inspiration email

  • May 19, 2015
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Recovering strategy and management consultant went on a career safari to find her true calling as… | Christie Mims
  • in Christie Mims, Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Recovering strategy and management consultant went on a career safari to find her true calling as… | Christie Mims

Christie Mims

Recovering strategy and management consultant went on a career safari to find her true calling as a women’s career coach.


Christie Mims

Listen-Podcast-Here

Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

#1 Path to Growth

"First of all I'd stop doing what I think I should do and start doing what I wanted to do. I thought you had to build a local coaching practice before you could build a global one. I felt like I had to go to local networking events. I wish I had started guest posting, guest speaking and guests webinar presenting from day one to connect with people the way I wanted to connect with them."
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2)

The Growth Sweetspot

"There's a really cool overlap where you can be the most you, you can inject all of your personality and expertise overlapping with what the people you're serving really need. If you hit that sweet spot, they love you for being yourself because it allows them to be themselves. Your business grows because of it."
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3)

Self-inflicted roadblock

"What I want is scaring me so I'm doing the safe thing. But I need to do the scary thing because that's where the success is going to be."
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4)

Favorite part

"Becoming who I want to be as a person. Someone who faces fears, does it anyway and takes risks."
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5)

Weird move that worked

“In DC everybody was asking me how my business was. I said, ‘It's great, I'm leaving.' I wanted to be near the water and was done with DC."
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6)

Bad Conventional Wisdom

"If you've just started a new business you HAVE to get on social media. That's terrible advice for a variety of reasons. One is when you first start a business you usually don't have a team and social media takes a lot of time.”
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In the audio, Christie Mims shares:

-- The #1 limiting mindset she'd overcome if she could start over again

-- Her biggest mistake which involves the fallacy of safety

-- How she fell into her big mistake again six months later and her advice so you don't fall into this

-- What was killing her and the thing that brought her out of that darkness

-- What held her back and the counterintuitive thing she did that grew her business by leaps and bounds

-- The bad conventional wisdom involving businesses and social media

Christie Mims is the Founder and CEO of The Revolutionary Club, the number one destination for smart women who are unwilling to settle for anything less than career happiness.

Compassionate, caring, and a little kick-ass, Christie is here to make sure that you love what you do because life is too short to NOT love what you do.

She’s A certified professional coach and recovering consultant with a background working for Fortune 500 companies.

She's dispensed career advice for Forbes, LearnVest, Brazen Careerist, Yahoo! and many more, and can be seen speaking at the University of VA, The Daily Muse, Women for Hire, The US Army, and at a variety of other organizations.

She started out as a strategy and management consultant because she felt like it's what you do when you have a history degree and no further direction from there. She figured she would discover what she was passionate about doing but looked up and it was 8 years later.

She had a fantastic job at a wonderful Fortune 500 company but something was missing.

She finally went and got some coaching. She discovered she loved this and that there was such a huge need out there for it both for women and men. But she is passionate about helping and coaching other women.

She recently did a happy dance when her website was named a Forbes Top 100 for careers

Some Shareables from Christie Mims in this episode…

Biggest mistake

"When I was first starting out I wanted to have a career coaching business but I was scared. I had an opportunity to partner with other coaches in an educational business so that's what I did. Even though it wasn't what I wanted to do I felt so much safer working with other people. It distracted me from my business and my own growth."

Weirdest thing

"This did not happen to me I did it to myself. I had a coaching practice in Washington DC helping people find work that they love. It's a great place to be because people there are miserable. I left all my connections in DC and moved to San Francisco. People told me I was crazy for moving my business and starting out new in one of the most expensive cities in America."

Counterintuitive

"I wanted to be a career coach. The conventional wisdom was that you had to wear a suit and be Uber professional. Don't talk about anything personal because this is career coaching not life coaching. That was what I thought I had to be in the beginning... super professional and detached. In my work I'm very professional but I'm also very me and share crazy stories."

Bad conventional wisdom

"If you've just started a new business you HAVE to get on social media. That's terrible advice for a variety of reasons. One is when you first start a business you usually don't have a team and social media takes a lot of time. Second, as an entrepreneur it's hard to do many things well yet you're called to do everything for the most part especially in the beginning. The advice I give is don't be on every social network. Instead, figure out the one or two places where your clients and referral partners hang out and then just be awesome in those places."

"Social media is a chance for people to get to know and like you. And get an idea of what you do and learn from you. So you've got to be active there and it should be fun. I hated it for a while because I was trying to be everywhere and didn't have a plan."

Learn more about Christie Mims:

http://TheRevolutionaryClub.com - if you're feeling stuck, stressed, drained or just want an inspirational boost then head over to the revolutionary club.

She offers a "fancy pants" workbook at http://FindMyPassion.com. It's six simple steps to find work that makes you happy.

  • May 12, 2015
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Mismatched for the corporate world, Greg makes fateful “burn the ships” decision, survives the doghouse, and now thrives… | Greg Cesar
  • in Greg Cesar, Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Mismatched for the corporate world, Greg makes fateful “burn the ships” decision, survives the doghouse, and now thrives… | Greg Cesar

Greg Cesar

Mismatched for the corporate world, Greg makes fateful "burn the ships" decision, survives the doghouse, and now thrives living the good life he envisioned


Greg Cesar

Listen-Podcast-Here

Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

#1 Path to Growth

If I could go back but you took everything from me, the very first thing I'd do is build an e-mail list. It's the absolute first thing I did except what I'd do differently is I would understand it's not just about asking for the e-mail it's about providing value.
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2)

Biggest mistake

My biggest mistake was not focusing on setting up systems. Every time I look back on my business I'd say, 'I don't have a business. I sell products.' We're taking steps to build something that is a sustainable business. More importantly, something I could sell at some point.
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3)

1 way to create evangelists

Lots of people recommend their friends come see me when I speak because when I teach, I don't hold things back. I give them the real deal and so what I create is evangelists.
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4)

What Experts Don’t Know

Bonus flop - We were selling around 100 units a day and went all the way up to 101. I offered the bonus for about six months. It only increased our sales by about .01%. I took that bonus off the sales page. What was free is now an upsell. We sold over $250,000 of that thing as an upsell.
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5)

Sales wisdom

If you're trying to make money but you haven't read a sales book, I don't know what to tell you. How successful can you be if you don't understand the psychology of sales?
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6)

Where the money is

The guy who's close to 13 years old wants to go to Google. So in 40 years, classifieds may not be good. But right now, that's where the people who have the disposable income are going.
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In the audio, Greg Cesar shares:

-- The story of how a coaching client paid him $1,000 to get on a 5-minute call in order to buy a $2,000 product

-- The strategy he used so his very first customer in 1997 is still paying him every month 17 years later

-- The 2 words you must have in your success vocabulary and the order they must be in

-- The fateful decision that landed him in the doghouse but unleashed his inner and outer freedom

-- Greg reveals the most important element in the sales process and you'd probably consider it "old school"

-- Why he says the e-mail list isn't important and what is instead the critical business factor

-- His big mistake that set up "job like income machines" instead of true businesses that were assets

-- The big question he asks his paying consulting clients so they teach him their very best marketing strategy

-- His $250,000 counterintuitive gain out of a test that flopped huge

Greg Cesar is an international expert in creative internet marketing strategies. He’s been invited to speak on stages as far away as Singapore and Malaysia.

Greg has helped thousands of students to drive more laser targeted traffic to their websites. Greg is a creative thinker and uses out of the box strategies to dominate niche markets. In his courses and trainings, you will learn how to use MindSet Marketing and find hidden entry points in your mark. You’ll learn the emotional triggers that get more people to click on your ads and buy from you.

You’ll even learn how to go after large competitive markets and get your clicks for pennies while others spend dollars.

It doesn’t take long before you realize that Greg is an expert marketer and can help your business. If you need more laser targeted traffic to your website, then Greg Cesar is your man.

He's got some large e-mail lists of over 100,000 people in certain industries. In the industry where he speaks and trains internationally though, his e-mail list of people interested in learning more about Internet marketing is less than 10,000 yet generates over $100,000 in income every year. Greg proves it's not about the size of your e-mail list it's about your relationship with the people who subscribe to you.

He started a corporate job and one day his boss told him, “When I tell you to do something, you do it." Greg knew that day and with that statement that he was unemployable. A couple months later he quit his job with no expectations and less than $1,000 in the bank.

He had to tell his wife she's no longer a stay at home mom and to pile on further, that they had to move in with her parents because Greg was going to start a business. After spending a few days outside with the dogs, then a couple weeks on the couch, the family adjusted to his news.

He had a choice to make to either succeed or fail because he had no fallback. The first couple years were very tough. He learned and also took the second critical step which is action. He started helping businesses in his local area with their websites and online marketing strategy. Around 2002, he decided he wanted to sell products. The only reason for this was to get more local businesses as clients.

He wanted to be able to use the pitch, “Why would you go with that consultant when they've never sold any products of their own? I've sold this many products successfully so I'm the best choice to help you sell your products”. What Greg learned is he got so good at selling products he had sold over 100,000 e-books and products in over 100 different countries. It was taking him a fraction of the time to sell products versus the consulting. He's sold pinball machines, pool tables and many other physical products.

Some Shareables from Greg Cesar in this episode…

#1 Path to Growth

"If I could go back but you took everything from me, the very first thing I'd do is build an e-mail list. It's the absolute first thing I did except what I'd do differently is I would understand it's not just about asking for the e-mail it's about providing value. I want them to say to themselves, 'wow, I can't believe I just got them and the only thing I had to trade for it was my e-mail.'

Your second step is to monetize that list. Most people have it reversed, they are only thinking about the monetization. When I tell you what I've been able to do because of marketing to my list versus not having that list, it's night and day difference."

Biggest mistake

"My biggest mistake was not focusing on setting up systems. Every time I look back on my business I'd say, 'I don't have a business. I sell products.' I've gotten really good at selling products but not setting up a business. A system has something like 'on Monday this activity gets done. On Tuesday this other thing gets done. In the afternoon this person does such and such activity.' I don't have that. I'm always flying by the seat of my pants.

You may make good money selling things but that's not an asset you can pass on to your kids. If something happens to me, the business is over. I've realized that and I'm starting to read the E-myth Revisited by Michael Gerber. Then I had a meeting with one of my admins.

I said your role is going to change into project management and organization. We need to put some organizational things in place so that things can happen even when I'm not there. Because if I go on vacation, things stop here. That's not a business. We're taking steps to build something that is a business and is more sustainable. More importantly, something I could sell at some point."

Favorite part of Entrepreneurship

"The best part for me was falling in love with the entrepreneur's journey itself. I tell people if they're serious about becoming an entrepreneur then they have to fall in love with every aspect of what it takes to build a business. That includes both success and failure.

By the way, failure is just a part of the journey. Failure is not something you avoid, it's something you learn from. When I'm looking and learning something new, I'm like a kid with a new toy... I absolutely love it.

When we go out to dinner you know what my wife says, ‘Don't you dare talk about marketing tonight!' She has to shut me up when it comes to marketing. I often say a lot of NBA players would play for free. I'd do marketing for free. That's how much I love it.

When we first started in business and weren't making any money, I didn't have the heart to tell my parents, friends and wife that, 'I know we're not making any money, but man am I having fun. This is great!' I was loving it then and now."

Weirdest thing and lesson learned

"This is a lesson in why you value your clients, treat them great and give them respect. I had a coaching client who paid me $2,000 for three coaching sessions. We had the first session which was fine. He was excited.

The second session he calls me up and wants to meet on Friday. He's from Singapore. We got on the phone and I asked him what was on the agenda for today's call. He said, 'actually I have a question for you. What other products are you selling?' I said well we've got this product and that product and this other one. He asked me how much one of them was.

I said that one is $2,000. He said, ‘Can I buy it?' I said, ‘Okay. I'll send you a link.' I sent him the link and he said he was going to get that product. I then said okay let's get into the coaching call and what we're going to cover today. He said, ‘No. I'm good.'

I got off the call and told my wife, ‘The weirdest thing just happened. Some guy just paid me money to call me on the phone and buy more stuff.' We were only on the phone for about five minutes. So he paid me $1,000 to buy a $2,000 product. I said how do I find more of these people? I need more of that in my life.

I get a lot of people recommending me to their friends and associates to come see me when I speak because when I teach, I don't hold things back. I give them the real deal and so what I create is evangelists. There are other speakers out there who may make sales. But they are not getting that long-term client relationships that I am able to enjoy. You got treat people right and those weird things can happen as well."

Counterintuitive Big Win

"We had a product we were selling and selling very well. I decided we were going to add a bonus to the product. This was about two years into selling the product. My thinking was that this bonus was gonna double our sales.

We were selling around 100 units a day and we went all the way up to 101. I said, ‘What just happened here?!!? How did this not double the sales?'

I figured our test run wasn't long enough so I ran it for about six months. It only increased our sales by about .01%. It was completely not worth it. The one thing good marketers know is we know that we don't know.

I took that bonus off the sales page and made it an upsell. What was for free is now an upsell where they have to pay for it. We sold over $250,000 of that thing as an upsell."

Bad conventional wisdom

"There's a lot of it out there and I'll tell you the mindset you have to have if you're going into business for yourself.

Go back to the basics.

My most successful headline was written 100 years ago. The wisdom is that old. When you look at some of these guys who are the godfathers of marketing, we are still using headlines they wrote back in the 1920s. You've got to go back to the basics. That's what works.

What's happening today is there are a lot of gimmicks and a lot of tricks. People want to figure out how to game Google. The problem is those are all gimmicks and loopholes. You build your business on this. On Monday you’rr in business but by Tuesday you're out of business. You've got to learn skills and how to write copy. You've got to understand what makes a good headline. You've got to understand the psychology behind sales.

If you're trying to make money but you haven't read a sales book, I don't know what to tell you. How successful can you be if you don't understand the psychology of sales?

It's funny when I talk to people about off-line classifieds. These are people who've picked up a newspaper. What makes you think they don't read? Baby boomers and older folks don't want to go to Google. They want to go to print because that's where they've been raised.

The guy who's close to 13 years old wants to go to Google. So in 40 years, classifieds may not be good. But right now, that's where the people who have the disposable income are going."

Learn more about Greg Cesar:

http://GregCesar.com - Find all his cool new ideas, lessons learned and products.

  • May 6, 2015
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Former Jujitsu gym owner and champion discovers email segmentation strategy as a means to survive but now… | Daniel Faggella”
  • in Daniel Faggella, Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Former Jujitsu gym owner and champion discovers email segmentation strategy as a means to survive but now… | Daniel Faggella”

Daniel Faggella

Former Jujitsu gym owner and champion discovers email segmentation strategy as a means to survive but now applies it to bigger companies to thrive


Daniel Faggella

Listen-Podcast-Here

Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

Physical to Online Business Commonalities

"The commonalities from my physical business to what I do in consulting is a relatively straight-line. I wish I could have gotten good at everything like design and even telemarketing. But my big talent is e-mail marketing.”
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2)

Grouping for Success

"Segmenting your website visitors on the front-end leads to better conversions and better relationships."
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3)

E-mail segmenting = long-term success

"E-mail segmenting -- it's not just about the impact that week. It's about how much more relevant your entire relationship and communications will be with those folks."
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4)

When winning SEO doesn’t…

“If you win the SEO game for martial arts in Los Angeles your phone rings a lot. If you win the SEO game for martial arts in Wakefield Rhode Island, your phone still doesn't ring that much."
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5)

Where 1/50th effort leads to massive gain

“If there was a tiny effort, I mean 1/50th of what L.L. Bean puts into segmenting, we could see much better ROI. I mean simple stuff like segmenting customers from prospects or segmenting by industry."
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6)

Focus yet Violate

"I'm definitely on the focused side, I just sin against my own business principles from time to time."
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In the audio, Dan Faggella shares:

-- The common mistake where 1/50th more effort to correct it leads to big lifts in your sales

-- When 1% conversion is good and times when it's bad

-- What stealth segmenting is and why your website guests will love it

-- How to avoid the "initial success, overeager expansion" mistake

-- 3 big business concepts he applies to all areas of life

-- His e-mail segmentation strategy to get an immediate revenue boost of 30% or more

-- A specific strategy where asking a web visitor for more information leads to higher conversion

-- His technique to double or triple conversions in your e-mail campaign while building a stronger relationship with subscribers who buy and those who don't buy

-- Big revenue boost - how one or two data points plus an additional $.20 or $.30 per subscriber per month over 12 months adds up to huge gains

Daniel Faggella is a recognized email marketing expert, entrepreneur, and speaker. Starting his first business in his undergraduate years, Dan began with his second business while attending the University of Pennsylvania's prestigious Master of Applied Positive Psychology program.

Selling his first business at age 25 and moving from Rhode Island to Boston, Dan's passion lies in helping startup and existing businesses use marketing automation technology to drastically increase their Customer Lifetime Value (CLV), and drive business metrics that matter.

Dan's expertise has been recognized not only by the many companies he's helped directly, but by major media sites such as the Boston Business Journal, MarketingProfs, Direct Marketing News, and more. He has been interviewed on popular shows such as MIXERGY, GrowthHacker.tv, Entrepreneur on Fire, and many others. He also speaks around the country on successful marketing strategy and business, including the eMarketing Association's national conference, Bryant University, the Cambridge Innovation Center, and more.

He dedicated close to a decade to Brazilian jujitsu. He won the no Gi Pan Ams competition three years back.

He's always been fascinated with human potential both mentally and physically so he studied sports psychology for his undergrad at the University of Pennsylvania. He paid for all of it by running a jujitsu gym. He got it up to 100 students before he sold it. Now he sells jujitsu programs online. He's got that up to a little over $50,000 per month now.

He's been in really small towns and small niches so has had to make the most of a few leads. A lot of that has to do with e-mail segmentation and database marketing.

Today, Daniel works with a select group of companies ranging from software, hard products, eCommerce, service businesses and beyond.

Some Shareables from Daniel Faggella in this episode…

#1 Path to Growth

"I started in a physical gym. I would have kept the fighting to be a lot more fun and just had a little warehouse space. I would have focused right away on the online marketing and appealing to a global market, rather than staying in my little town of 8,000 people. It took a really long time to get past the 70 student mark when you're in a town where that's like 1% of the human population there.

I would have gone right online with all of the SEO emphasis and e-mail emphasis. If I could kick my 20 year old self in the shin and yell at him, I'd tell him to go online where there are vaster lead sources and revenue opportunities."

Biggest negative incident

"I had a borderline roof collapse in my martial arts gym. We were shoveling out gargantuan buckets of slush after a blizzard."

Biggest Mistake

"This goes back to my brick-and-mortar experience not my various online businesses. I expanded my gym's physical space faster than made sense. We expanded before the absolute bursting at the seams necessity demanded it. We took our floorspace from 2,500 sq. ft. to 4,500 sq. ft., almost doubling it. We had additional staff and rent expenses.

We suspected the upcoming school year would get us where we needed to be but it ended up taking closer to two years before we got our student base up to the level to support these additional expenses. We got overeager due to some initial success.”

Favorite part of Entrepreneur’s Journey

"I really like finding concepts I can apply to life in general which is fulfilling to me. Just finding business lessons in general that apply in other areas. I've had multiple LLC's since I was a pretty young guy spinning lots of different plates. One concept that stuck and led to the founding of CLV Boost was the segmentation strategy.

This is breaking down who is in our database in terms of subscribers, leads and customers. We know what their age groups, interests, goals and industries are so we can send them the most relevant e-mails possible.

Some hiring procedures and some firing procedures were two other concepts that stuck long-term. I can take these things into my next venture, someone I'm consulting with, or a business I'm looking to invest in."

Weirdest thing and Lesson Learned

"I was in the very early days of my martial arts gym. I was in like a 300 sq. ft. space with no windows. We had multiple dehumidifiers, otherwise everybody would get ringworm because it would get super drippy and horrible all the time. I had two of my paid instructors who got into a fistfight in the middle of teaching a jujitsu class.

They were rolling live and grappling and apparently it got personal. There was swearing and students freaking out. That was one fun and strange experience of personal dynamics in the business world."

Counterintuitive

"The commonalities from my physical business to what I do in consulting is a relatively straight line. I wish I could have gotten good at everything like design and even telemarketing. But my big talent is e-mail marketing.

Generic Advice - when you're collecting leads you don't want to ask for more information on the front end. Make things really simple and just get the e-mail. From there you can e-mail them because it's a really low barrier of entry to communicate with.

Instead, what I've done for about four years that's counterintuitive and was the only reason I was able to sell my business, and I'll be selling my online business for a significantly higher number, is because we have segmented our leads on the front end in a couple of different ways.

Number one we like to allow folks, depending on the service or the major goal they have, to select that in a drop-down while we are collecting either name, e-mail and/or phone number when it's applicable. You have to test, but on the aggregate it converts higher.

Let's say we're getting conversion of 15% on a landing page. We’ll sometimes see a 17% conversion, or 13%, with the addition of one drop-down. There was this big ranting, raving fear around more information. But we found some times it had the opposite affect or it was negligible in terms of statistical significance.

The e-mail follow up being calibrated by the individual's goals allows for much better down funnel conversions and e-mail marketing down the line because instead of getting a vanilla newsletter, now all the people interested in e-commerce, I can just send them a piece I did for Marketing Land on e-commerce. I don't have to send the piece I did on building organic engagement. I can save that for the subset of my subscribers who are interested in that particular tactic.

Down funnel it's a better relationship, better conversion. Upfront, it's relatively similar conversion to a lead and sometimes even higher conversion. That's been counterintuitive to what's generally recommended with e-mail opt in and e-mail marketing."

Stealth segmenting

"Sometimes segmenting can be done behind the scenes so none of your website guests even see it. For example, if you went to the page on my website about the kids martial arts program, all you'd see on the sidebar is name, e-mail and phone number. But when you entered your info, that form would send you into my communication campaign for the kids program. I can get another data field without the website visitor having to do anything. Then later during the communication process I send them topic specific newsletters... no vanilla newsletters."

Bad Conventional Wisdom

"There is a lot here. Gun to my head, if there's one thing I see people doing wrong time and time again, it's the philosophy that "Bland is okay" for certain kinds of messaging. E-mail is treated as if it's free because it's basically free-ish. Until your list reaches a certain size it doesn't cost you money each time you press the send button. Because it's treated as a free channel, the effort put into it is often junk or throwaway effort.

Instead let's look at L.L. Bean.

They sell nationally and I believe internationally as well. I believe their revenues were in excess of $1.5 billion in 2013. These guys are in the game. They use a print catalog. If you think they send the same print catalog to everybody on their list you are gravely mistaken.

Print catalogs aren’t free. You've got to kill trees for that. This costs ink and shipping. The way they segment their messages is dead serious... it's calibrated toward return on investment. This contrasts to what most of us do for e-mail with our one-size-fits-all seven day campaign.

We think they're bad leads but we probably just freaked them out with bland messaging. You've also probably received the bland ‘We're still alive' newsletter. I call them ‘Red button e-mails'. It's as if you have your entire e-mail list and one big red button that just says ‘Blast'. You just slam this thing like Whack-a-mole.

This is despite the fact that if you were mailing in print or calling people individually, you wouldn't treat them all the same. Not only because you don't want them to have an experience that breaks your relationship, but because you really want to sell.

If there was a tiny effort, I mean 1/50th of what L.L. Bean puts into segmenting, we could see much better ROI. I mean simple stuff like segmenting customers from prospects or segmenting by industry."

Learn more about Daniel Faggella:

CLVBoost.com -- here they blog and write about e-mail marketing segmentation and marketing automation. Right now they have a “5 plug and play strategies" white paper you can download.

Her corporate friends said she was crazy. But she escaped the golden handcuffs… | JT O’Donnell

JT O'Donnell

Her corporate friends said she was crazy. But she escaped the golden handcuffs, got ahead of a trend and now thrives big.


JT O'Donnell

Listen-Podcast-Here

Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

Why Entrepreneurship?

"What led me to make the jump to entrepreneurship? Fear. Fear that I'd go back to corporate and be miserable for the next 20 years and have nobody to blame but myself."
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2)

Manager NOT Mentor

"Most managers have not been trained how to coach and they also have a full-time job to do."
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3)

A doctor, a lawyer and a Career Coach walk…

"You have doctors, lawyers and financial planners. We go get experts in every other area of our lives yet it is not common sense or common knowledge yet to seek and retain a career coach. I'll work for ever to change that perception."
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4)

Biggest Mistake

“Every once in a while a person isn't a fit. You need to recognize that sooner rather than later. It's a tough conversation to have but you're doing them a favor too. This is their career so don't let them waste months or years with you while hurting your business.”
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5)

Conventional Myth

"The idea that the customer is always right. I haven't adhered to that because often times it can run your business into the ground. Instead I stepped back and said, 'I'm going to get really clear on who my customer is.’ I'm not going to assume everyone is my customer.”
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6)

Paralyzing Fear

"What we are really fearful of when we start on our own is, 'who am I to think I can run a business? Who am I to think I can actually do this?'We're trying to find all these ways to legitimize what we're doing. Nothing legitimizes your business faster than you doing a project and selling it."
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In the audio, JT shares:

-- The Magic realization that saved her 20 years of misery

-- #1 thing she'd have done differently to upscale her service business

-- The big myth and problem with believing you'll get good coaching from your manager or anywhere inside the company you work for

-- The biggest hiring mistakes she's made despite her over 20 years as a top HR professional

-- Her process for being able to hire a top talent for your team in a 30 day time period

-- How Richard Branson commented on one of her articles and why she believes LinkedIn publishing is the great equalizer you deserve to take advantage of

-- Her #1 thing to do on the front end that almost guarantees you'll exceed customer expectations

Jeanine Tanner “J.T.” O’Donnell

Jeanine Tanner “J.T.” O’Donnell has 18+ years of experience in the development of professional HR tools and resources. She has delivered 200+ presentations to more than 10,000 professionals on a wide variety of career topics. In addition to that she has managed teams of 50+ with budgets of $35M+.

Launched CAREEREALISM.com, which is now a top 3 career blog with 2,300,000+ monthly page views, 800,000+ visitors/month, 1,500,000+ social media followers, and 100,000+ daily email subscribers.

In high school she was the captain of her cheerleading squad and when the Beach Boys band came through town they enlisted the captains of all the local high schools to get on stage and dance with them. JT obliged them.

She was in HR and staffing for many years and climbed the corporate ladder. By many people’s definition she had it all... the over six figure salary, managing many people and all the perks that go along with the position of authority in corporate America. But she felt the weight of the golden handcuffs in other areas of her life.

She was out of shape and 40 pounds overweight. She had high blood pressure, a husband she never saw, a house she was never at and was out of touch with the rest of her family and friends. She realized she loved teaching. She knew she had to make changes so scrapped the corporate life.

She took a year off to figure out what she was going to do next. The question, “How do people deal with this?" Kept coming up for her. She figured she wasn't the only one dealing with this. She found out it was an epidemic, we weren't fixing it and that her HR background could be a big help to fix it. She got certified to be a career coach and launched her business.

Many of her corporate friends laughed and wrote her off.

Not long after those same people would secretly call and ask for her help. They'd of course ask her not to tell anybody. Her business grew but she hit a wall coaching one on one. She decided she was going to build a business. She told her husband she was going to start a blog in 2008 right when the financial collapse happened.

She wanted to do it in a super professional way and offer the bleeding edge career advice to lead people out of the collapse and into the brave new corporate world. 70% of people are unhappy in their work. JT's business was well-positioned to help these people once they came to this realization.

Some Shareables from JT in this episode…

#1 Path to Growth

"I'm in a service business. If I could go back I would have productized my business much sooner. Every client comes to you thinking they want something different. You feel the obligation to customize it to each client. That is very time-consuming. When I productized, honed in on specific things, built tools and resources to support it and sell coaching in a product type way, the scalability became much clearer and easier to achieve."

Recession

"Now that the recession is changing, most professionals today don't expect to get any coaching from their manager or company because they don't trust it. They now understand that management team has an agenda which is the company's agenda. Smart people now are gonna say they're a business of one and if they're going to partner with this company they’ll need to get an outside coach and resources that have their best interest in mind."

Biggest mistake

"We all make hiring mistakes. It doesn't even matter how long you've been in HR. It's always easier to see when you're not the manager nor the owner. I tend to hold on to people too long. There's a part of me that wants to make it work. I'm not doing that person a favor. I'm lucky to say I can count on one hand how many times this has ever happened to me. Every once in a while a person isn't a fit. You need to recognize that sooner rather than later. It's a tough conversation to have but you're doing them a favor too. This is their career so don't let them waste months or years with you while hurting your business. When I do make the mistake of holding on too long I try not to beat myself up too much about it because it does happen."

Favorite part

"My favorite part of the entrepreneur's journey is getting to work on something I care about every day. We have a process here where the ideal level of career satisfaction is when your core work you have to do every day, your reach work that stretches you and grows your skill, and your passion work that you care about are all fully aligned. I get to do my passion work every day. It doesn't feel like work. That was done with intention. It wasn't easy. It took a ton of work but I loved every minute of it because I was in control. If I could bottle this and give it to people, it's like a high."

Weirdest thing

"The weirdest thing that's ever happened to me is the cryptic e-mail I got from LinkedIn. It was from an editor at LinkedIn. It was one line. It said, "JT we really like your take on LinkedIn. We want to approach you about something and you need to sign a nondisclosure but we can't tell you what it is." I've never gotten a business request like that. Of course, I signed the nondisclosure because I wanted to know what was going on. It was them announcing the fact they were starting the Influencers program on LinkedIn. I remember thinking, ‘Wow this is crazy cool. What do you want me to do? I'll give it a try.' Ironically, a lot of people turned it down. A lot of people wanted to get paid. It's an unpaid thing to write for Influencers.

When I started, they had 140 initial Influencers. Today I believe they have around 400. When they had 140 I was dead last. I was the only career coach and I had 2,000 followers. I said I'll give it a try. I poured my heart and soul into it. Fast forward to today and it's really served me well. I don't know where I'd be today if I'd have ignored that and thought it was too weird to respond to."

Counterintuitive

"The idea that the customer is always right. I haven't adhered to that because often times it can run your business into the ground. Instead I stepped back and said, 'I'm going to get really clear on who my customer is. I'm not going to assume everyone is my customer. I'm going to build a business model that makes it really clear on the front-end who is the ideal customer for us.' What the expectations are for our partnership and how that works. This was a way to minimize customer service issues.

If you go to our website, you'll see we don't make any empty promises. We don't say we’ll work with just anyone. Quite the contrary. There's a really specific type of person we can help. It has a lot to do with their mindset, what they understand, what they're willing to commit and bring to the table because it is a partnership."

Conventional Myth

"I think people tend to over set up their businesses. They feel like they can't get started until they have the fancy marketing material, the perfect website. They will overspend. I'm a firm believer in hobby careers. Start your business small and just try to find a way to make money. Don't go crazy until you show you've got something that can make money and pay for itself.

I've seen too many times people will put together these huge fancy things only to have to change them or find out they're not the right fit as they evolve with their client base and realize their clients want something different. My suggestion is to bootstrap. Think about every single purchase. Go lean and mean. Start generating income first, then you can have all those fancy things later on."

Learn more about J.T. O’Donnell:

http://CareeRealism.com

http://CareerHMO.com

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