X
  • July 2, 2015
  • By Sean
  • Comments Off on Self-described fixed mindset sufferer from the fixed IQ era of the US, shares what she did to overcome… | Carol Dweck
  • in Carol Dweck, Hidden Profit Path Podcasts

Self-described fixed mindset sufferer from the fixed IQ era of the US, shares what she did to overcome… | Carol Dweck

Carol Dweck

Self-described fixed mindset sufferer from the fixed IQ era of the US, shares what she did to overcome and sell over 1 million copies of her book worldwide


Carol Dweck

Listen-Podcast-Here


Most Popular to Share on Google+ and LinkedIN:

1)

Everyone has but loses…

“Everyone as a baby has a natural thirst to learn and grow. But many lose this due to the era or society they grow up in."
LinkedBtngoogleBtn

2)

How to develop a growth mindset

"I grew up in the fixed IQ era. Through my research, I've been amazed at what I and others can accomplish when adopting a growth mindset."
LinkedBtngoogleBtn

3)

The biggest factor separating the successful from the unsuccessful

“Whether you're a student, athlete or entrepreneur having that growth mindset serves you well because you take on the right challenges and learn from what happens to you rather than being defensive."
LinkedBtngoogleBtn

4)

Common traits shared by the successful

“First I want to point out that mindsets are just beliefs. They're not fixed personality traits. Our research has shown we can teach people a growth mindset.”
LinkedBtngoogleBtn

5)

Common big mistakes of business owners

"The first mistake is to feel that as the boss you have to know everything… To know all the answers. Instead, you are one of the learners like everybody else. Admit mistakes and learn from them. Listen to input from your employees.
LinkedBtngoogleBtn

We have found in our research that when you do this the employees feel so much more empowered and committed to your business.”

6)

The most productive kind of feedback

“We find in our research, giving feedback about your process and strategy is the kind of corrective feedback a leader needs constantly. And it's the kind of feedback a leader needs to give to others. And rewarding people for failures if they've really milked something valuable out of it.”
LinkedBtngoogleBtn

In the audio, Carol Dweck shares:

– Me-search: What is it and which of the two groups of people succeed?

- The two mindsets. Failure is devastating if you have one mindset, energizing if you have the other

– The biggest factor separating the successful from the unsuccessful

- Which of the two mindsets Carol started out with and which she's developing in herself right now

- Her research shows this type of company culture fosters the best innovation and employee commitment

- What praise and mindset to seek out to stay on top of new trends

Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., is a leading researcher in the field of motivation and is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford. She has a new TED talk. Her research focuses on why people succeed and how to foster their success. More specifically, her work has demonstrated the role of mindsets in success and has shown how praise for intelligence can undermine motivation and learning.

She has also held professorships at and Columbia and Harvard Universities, has lectured to education, business, and sports groups all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. She recently won the Distinguished Scientific Contribution awards from the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Her work has been prominently featured in such publications as The New Yorker, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Manchester Guardian, and The London Times, with recent feature stories on her work in the Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, and she has appeared on such shows as Today, Good Morning America, NPR’s Morning Edition, and 20/20. Her bestselling book Mindset (published by Random House) has been widely acclaimed and has been translated into more than 20 languages. It has sold over 1 million copies worldwide.

Some Shareables from Carol Dweck in this episode…

The biggest factor separating the successful from the unsuccessful

"Some people believe their basic talents and abilities are just fixed traits. They believe you have a certain amount and that's it. I call this the fixed mindset. In a fixed mindset people worry if they're smart or not smart, if they're talented or not talented. They build their lives around looking talented and showing people they're smart.

Other people have a growth mindset. They believe these talents and abilities can be developed. Not everyone is the same but they can develop. They spend their time learning and trying to get smarter. These are the people who take on challenges. They are motivated and even energized in the face of setbacks because setbacks are informative. You can milk setbacks for lots of great information.

Whether you're a student, athlete or entrepreneur having that growth mindset serves you well because you take on the right challenges and learn from what happens to you rather than being defensive."

Common traits shared by the successful

“First I want to point out that mindsets are just beliefs. They're not fixed personality traits. Our research has shown we can teach people a growth mindset.

When we do, they become more open to change and perseverance. The first characteristic of someone with a growth mindset is the desire to take on challenges and learn. They don't say to themselves, ‘What if I make a mistake? What if I make a fool of myself?’

The second characteristic is a total commitment to what ever challenge they take on. Even when things go wrong you're not defensive but instead face up to it. They think what do I do next? A growth mindset is about growing, learning and persevering."

First step into the growth mindset

“No matter who you are or how strong you're fixed mindset is, the first thing you can do to start changing into a growth mindset is to recognize and own your fixed mindset. People think a fixed mindset is bad and simply deny having it. But they haven't done the work of recognizing and announcing to themselves that they have a fixed mindset. Instead listen to that fixed mindset voice in your head that wonders if you'll make a mistake and look like a fool.

Listen to that voice in your head that's telling you not to take risks and that mistakes are humiliating. Do that for a week or two. Rub your face in your fixed mindset.

Then, start talking back to that voice with a growth mindset. Tell yourself, ‘I’m going to take on this challenge no matter what. I made mistakes and my fixed mindset is making me feel embarrassed but I am going to keep going.’ Realize you have a choice. Keep talking back with the growth mindset."

Common big mistakes of business owners

"The first mistake is to feel that as the boss you have to know everything… To know all the answers. Instead, you are one of the learners like everybody else. Admit mistakes and learn from them. Listen to input from your employees.

We have found in our research that when you do this the employees feel so much more empowered and committed to your business.

Another big mistake is to focus just on hiring talent. We found that when a company just worships talent it doesn't have that innovative feel. The employees aren't nearly as motivated. Instead focus on employee growth and giving employees the chance to take on projects and shine."

Counterintuitive start up wisdom

“Common intuition is that a strong leader knows everything and is totally confident. He decides everything right away. He doesn't need input. He's the resident genius. But that is not a recipe for long-term success.”

Bad conventional wisdom

“Thing we've found over and over in our research is that the kind of praise we give one another is tremendously important. A lot of entrepreneurs want the wrong kind of praise and give the wrong kind of praise. We have found that praising talent, intelligence and ability backfires. It puts people into a fixed mindset and makes them vulnerable.

In the world today, most businesses are constantly transforming. You need people who tell you what you're doing right and what you're doing wrong. We find in our research, giving feedback about your process and strategy is the kind of corrective feedback a leader needs constantly. And it's the kind of feedback a leader needs to give to others. And rewarding people for failures if they've really milked something valuable out of it.”

Learn more about Carol Dweck:

http://MindsetOnline.com

Contact us

Using the contact form to send us email at below

Keep in touch with us

You can use the following information to contact us if you wanna join us or anything need to communicate.

Name: Stand Out Authority Raises Your National Status & Industry Recognition Administrator

Insider Tips

A Proven Process to Attract More Clients and Earn More Money